Articles
 Why we celebrate Purim
 Walking with God and His people
 The Jews and the Church
 What is your "two loaves and fish?"
 According to the pattern
 It's Purim week
 The way we connect to God
 Stay faithful
 Our February newsletter
 The first commandment and your identity

Series [All]
 Daniel Juster (50)
 Fruit of the Spirit (8)
 Guy Cohen (47)
 Introduction to Messianic Judaism (24)
 Juster summer trip
 Mark Rantz (2)
 The Mitzvah Book (93)
 Tikkun Articles (5)
 Torah Thoughts
 Zion's Glory

Archive


 

Tuesday, 3 November 2020
Judging, burdens and love

Question of the day: Are we to stop judging?

Answer: Read this scriptural quote and then answer the question. Matthew 7:1-2 "Stop judging, so that you may not be judged. For with the judgment you judge, you will be judged; and with the measure you use, it will be measured to you."

Seems very straightforward, right? But many (I would even say most) people misunderstand the intent. The verses that follow add to our understanding, so it is unfair to stop our understanding after the first two words or to stop reading after only the first two verses.

Clearly, we are not to lose our discernment. 1 Corinthians 2:15a "But the one who is spiritual discerns all things." Our discernment is our ability to tell the difference between right and wrong. What is being communicated in Mathew 7 is that we are not to condemn others. What's important, is to fix ourselves first. Only then will we be ready to ... Matthew 7:5b "see clearly to take the speck out of your brother's eye." Many people believe we are never to take the speck out of our brother's eye, but that's wrong thinking and against Scripture.

We do take the speck out of our brother's eye, not to condemn him/her, but to restore him/her. This is an act of love, not condemnation. The warning is against hypocrisy. Galatians 6:1 "Brothers and sisters, if someone is caught doing something wrong, you who are directed by the Ruach, restore such a person in a spirit of gentleness--looking closely at yourself so you are not tempted also."

If we move forward one verse, we get the point ... Galatians 6:2 "Bear one another's burdens, and in this way you fulfill the Torah of Messiah." Okay, what in the world is "the Torah of Messiah?" Well, the whole Torah is His and Who He is. Then how does bearing one another's burdens fulfill it? Because the entire Torah is love based (love motivated), and love is preferring another above self.

And the sacrifice of Messiah is the greatest act of love (and thus, the greatest fulfillment of the Torah) ever. John 15:13-14 "No one has greater love than this: that he lay down his life for his friends. You are My friends if you do what I command you." And we return His love when we obey Him.

Posted By Rabbi Michael Weiner, 11:00am Comment Comments: 0