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Monday, 11 January 2021
Where do quarrels come from?

Question of the Day: Jacob (James) 1:1 "Where do quarrels and conflicts among you come from?"

Answer: Side note: The book of Jacob was renamed James when brought forward from the Hebrew "Ya'akov" into English. But let's answer the question. The Bible describes the "quarrels and conflicts" as Jacob 4:2b "You fight and you wage war."

I know people (not just one) who live in offense. Many quarrels and conflicts come out of offense. John Bevere calls offense "The Bait of Satan." He even wrote a book by the same title. It's called "bait" because offense is always available. We "take the bait" when we become offended.

Offense is always a choice. Quite often offense is connected to pride. "I deserve to be treated better than I have been treated" would be a thought by someone who has taken the bait.

The solution? Eyes on Him. Hebrews 12:1-3 "Therefore, since we have such a great cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us also get rid of every weight and entangling sin. Let us run with endurance the race set before us, focusing on Yeshua, the initiator and perfecter of faith. For the joy set before Him, He endured the cross, disregarding its shame; and He has taken His seat at the right hand of the throne of God. Consider Him who has endured such hostility by sinners against Himself, so that you may not grow weary in your souls and lose heart."

The only One Who has a legitimate right to be offended is Yeshua, and He is not offended.

Philippians 2:5-7 "Have this attitude in yourselves, which also was in Messiah Yeshua, Who, hough existing in the form of God, did not consider being equal to God a thing to be grasped. But He emptied Himself -- taking on the form of a slave, becoming the likeness of men and being found in appearance as a man. He humbled Himself -- becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross."

Posted By Rabbi Michael Weiner, 11:16am Comment Comments: 0